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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
. >>> a dramatic rescue in portland, maine, caught on cell phone camera. 84-year-old ursula nixon lost control of her car on friday, and some good samaritans braved the cold waters to pull her out. police say nixon sped through a stop sign, two fences and an oceanfront barrier before she ended up in the portland harbor. she's in fair condition. several of her rescuers were treated for hypothermia. >>> a 10-year-old boy in philadelphia is in big trouble. see that white van crashing into those cars right there. police say on sunday he stole it and he's the one behind the wheel. surveillance camera shows him getting out and trying to run away, but someone stops him. police say the boy saw the keys on the rear door and went on a bief joyride. he wasn't just slapped on the wrist either. he's expected to be charged with auto theft. >>> in hong kong, an investigation into a deadly ferry collision is under way. at least 36 people were killed. dozens injured. a boat filled with revelers slammed into the ferry. more than 100 people were rescued and sent to hospitals. one person is still missing. report
back to years ago. this picture here includes former president nixon, president chu. at time i assume you were vice president. >> yes. >> what are the circumstances of that picture? henry kisse kissinger at the to. >> that's during official visit of president nixon to vietnam. >> why were you vice president? that story about why you were vice president seems to bother you to this day. >> well, as you know, i become premier 1965. and then i brought back a stability and unity. >> before you go any further, how did you become premier? >> well, you know, from -- after the military queue against -- >> 1963. >> then from november '63 to july '65 before i become premier, during a period of time only about two years, there are five or six changes in vietnam. we begin with a military government. it last a few months, and then a mixed civilian and military government. and then few months later, go back again to military. but anyway, the last government in the south before i become premier was civilian government. that mean the chief of state, mr. shue was the civilian. the prime minister was a
. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon in 1960, even reagan and carter in 1980, the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked defensive. that's the impression that often lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush is a good example of body language so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effe effective, aggressive debater. he was seen in the first debate as too aggressive. the sighs and the rest. in the second debate he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a just right approach by that time. those performances and all the other factors in the 2000 election held him back. >> humor. >> humor can be very important but it's something that has to -- some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again, reagan, most people feel, was prepared. >> remember what lloyd benson said about -- >> yes. >> dan quayle. >> that famous line. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. >> i just reread about
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
. which leads to lesson three -- appearances count, above all. jfk. tan. nixon? just out of the hospital, pale and refusing professional makeup. lighting counts, too. in 1984, reagan's people fussed more over his, man mondale's did over his. and reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get the rosy cheeks. lesson four. real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here, so, relax. learn your lines and don't speak in a look at your wristwatch because that will definitely hurt you. besides, 90 minutes and you're done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we're so glad you were watching. you may have noticed some differences here in our studio. let us hear from you at abcnews.com. and, of course, "nightline" will be along later. as we leave you tonight, with a look at the white house, aglow in pink in honor of breast cancer awareness month. we'll see you again tomorrow. until then, good night. >>> next at 6:00 disbelief in a albany school. the death of a teacher at the center of a student sex scandal. also. >> i am not now intimidated
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
of the heroism of the bystanders in portland, maine. urs la nixon broke her leg after she crashed her car into the harbor. several people you see in the pictures there they jumped into the water as the car slowly sank below the surface. nix nixon's family says she faces weeks of recovery but she's grateful to her rescuers. looked like about five people or so there, wolf, jumped in that water. i'm sure that water wasn't very warm either talking portland, maine. >> they saved her. good for them, good for her. >>> gloria borger sat down with ann romney. but first, our unsolicited advice panel is standing by. they're going to preview some key questions you're going to want to listen for in tonight's debate. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin
-aways as an issue, that goes back to kennedy and nixon. we've been talking about this part of reaction shots over 50 years. candidates still haven't mastered the thought you have to think about what you're looking like when you don't speak. bill clinton was one who actually used to practice his facial expressions for when he wasn't talking. i think most candidates would poo-poo that idea, but i think there is value in it. >> there is spin room for both sides, but the spin is going to be happening in the moment through social media, through twitter, through facebook. do you think that is a huge development because one false move can be global in a matter of seconds and trending on twitter? >> absolutely. you're on to something with that theory. i think twitter becomes the new spin room. the difference is that the spin room is spinning during the debate, not necessarily after. also, always before the spinning was handed down from the top down, and now you've got everybody in the country with the ability to weigh in and have an opinion as the debate is happening. i see a shift in a couple of ways. not
and debates have not been so decisive except when the races are very already tight, kennedy/nixon, gore/bush, but we may well see the narrative of a 1% romney which we've seen reinforcing the 47%. video and that -- and out of touch with not only his own being who he was, but with ordinary voters, average people in this country. >> i'm -- i'm eager to see how romney deals with follow-up questions. ryan's stuff the contention i don't have enough time, what i'm trying to basically tear apart the american social compact, you know, in some -- if you interpret it in one way but massively overhaul this nation's sort of tax plan, but i don't have time to get into the details, president obama's going to press him on this. >> well, right. well, one, you a situation where, you know, mitt romney apparently has all these memorized zingers that he's going to unleash on the president tomorrow, but then, what you don't hear folks talk about is, once the zinger has been thrown out there, then what? so he lays out and says energy independence, well when the follow-up question comes, what's the there ther
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
news, which wouldn't exist if it wasn't for what reagan did, and, you know, he's the guy from nixon. it's not balanced at all. you see the major networks, after the shows are over with republican speakers that were just blatantly lying, and they ask the host why they let them do it, and they say that's the only way we can get guests on tv is to allow these people to lie. it's not fair at all. and you, you guys put up the washington, why don't you just start with the "national enquirer"? it's all downhill from there. "the washington times," i don't know if you really read it, reverend moon, god rest his soul, his lovely paper is not exactly a newspaper. i mean, fair and balanced, fox? it's a joke. i mean, the media coverage got to be where they tell these people anyway. host: that's dion in new jersey. up next is an independent from ohio. you are on c-span. gerald, first of all, are you a true independent? have you made up your mind yet? caller: oh, yes, i made up my mind. i made up my mind quite a while ago. host: who are you going to vote for? caller: i'm strictly for obama because of
that late september leads can evaporate by election day. in 1968 hubert humphrey was down 15 points. nixon won it was less than 1 percent. in 1976, jimmy carter had a 33-point lead over gerald ford. three debates, ford had cut the lead to 5 points and led in the final polls and narrowly lost. jamie carter had a consistent advantage over ronald reagan but the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a reagan landslide. now he is building a lead in key battleground states, a consultant who worked for jimmy carter, finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from exit polls that republicans tend to respond to these polls less than oftentimes particularly to news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in. >> julie: 8 there was a huge swing. dukakis lost to bush. in 1992 incumbent president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
they helped john kennedy overtake richard nixon. 1980 helped reagan over take carter. 2000 helped bush overtake gore. romney was behind in 02 race for governor in massachusetts, he was trailing badly six weeks before the election. the campaign reorganized, romney pulled his advisors together. they decided on a new strategy which was to get tough and get specific and romney went on to win that 2002 race for governor in massachusetts. so we will see if he can repeat history here with these debates starting tonight. dagen and connell? connell: peter barnes reporting from denver for us. let's go to ron paul now, republican congressman from texas and former presidential candidate himself. he's calling in today on the telephone from texas. congressman paul, always good to talk to you. if a paul supporter is watching the debate tonight and needs to be convinced by romney, what does romney have to do, do you think? >> make sure he sounds a little bit different than the other and be convincing that his policies are a lot different. many people that joined the freedom movement were frustrated, y
probably running out of time. i will say that on the optimism front, can anyone imagine during the kennedy-nixon debates that we would all be watching it with twitter, that there would be fact checking, that there would be conversations going on? hearing him on the radio, he sounds a lot better. or anything like that. i think this is a great time for political coverage, and i hope that that turns out to be true in the next few weeks and that we do not instead see some degraded moments of politics, but i think it is going to be fascinating. >> thank you. do you want to pick up? anna? >> i am, again, anna sale, and i think what is most prominent is what we think about is who is winning, and thirdly, where is the race taking place, and that is what we are looking at, swing states, and that is where a lot of my reporting has been at over the last six months. we are clearly -- radio. voter voices is a big driver of how we want to cover the election, so we started a series this summer called "that is my issue," and with that, we are hearing what the candidates are focusing on, trying to get people to
, and as a student of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year v
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)